Press Release

EMBARGOED UNTIL October 04, 2019 10:00 AM

PEAK STRATA BODY URGES TERRITORY GOVERNMENT LEADERS TO CLARIFY RESIDENTIAL TENANCY ACT AMENDMENTS

PEAK STRATA BODY URGES TERRITORY GOVERNMENT LEADERS TO CLARIFY RESIDENTIAL TENANCY ACT AMENDMENTS

MASS CONFUSION AND EMOTIONAL HEARTACHE IF PEOPLE BUY PETS WITHOUT UNDERSTANDING THEIR RIGHTS IN STRATA TITLE PROPERTIES

The peak industry body for ACT’s $22 billion strata sector has urged Territory Government leaders to clarify tenants’ rights to keep pets in strata title properties – a highly emotional issue -- following recent amendments to the Residential Tenancy Act, due to commence next month.

They say it could be a potential disaster and “end in tears” literally for both new pets and owners.

Canberra strata title property tenants wanting pets will face mass confusion and emotional heartache if they purchase a new furry friend under the new regulations, only to be told they don’t have permission from the owners corporation.

People living in or renting strata titled property in the ACT – as opposed to single dwellings that do not fall under a strata scheme -- must still have permission from their owners corporation to have a pet (unless the Owners Corporation rules have being amended noting certain approvals).

The reforms applying to rental leases signed on or after November 1 when the new laws kick in, are expected to see pet ownership rise even higher than the 62% figure it currently sits at, and Strata Community Association (ACT) reminds rental tenants to seek permission from the owners corporation before making any impulse pet purchases.

SCA (ACT) President Chris Miller says, “Territory Government leaders need to make clear rental tenants rights in strata title properties under the amendments to the Residential Tenancy Act due to take effect next month.”

“Different to a home in the suburbs, there’s a right and wrong pet for an apartment block and rental tenants deserve to have their rights clearly explained by lawmakers under the new reforms, before purchasing a pet.”

Strata title property landlords and rental tenants are being reminded to do their homework on their owners corporation regulations, before making an impulse pet purchases. Fellow SCA (ACT) board member Jan Browne says, “Pets can have a positive impact on a strata community, but when an unsuitable furry friend is chosen without permission from the owners corporation this can cause endless disputes and emotional heartache.”

“Pet ownership is a very emotive issue and our industry wants to make sure that all residents have a clear understanding of any conditions for approval of animals as requested by their Owners Corporation.

Regardless of the new laws, pet owners still need permission from their owners corporation before they can move in a pet.”

“We don’t want to stop pets from living with their owners in strata communities, we just want lawmakers to clarify the rights of landlords and rental tenants in strata title properties under the new reforms.”

Strata Community Association (ACT) says landlords and rental tenants in strata title properties seeking advice on pet suitability and owners corporation requirements should speak to a professional strata manager to get the best advice.

ENDS

About

Strata Community Association Limited (SCA) is the peak industry body for Body Corporate and Community Title Management in Australia & New Zealand. Membership includes body corporate managers, support staff, committee members and suppliers of products and services to the industry. SCA proudly fulfils the dual roles of a professional institute and consumer advocate. SCA has in excess of 3,300 members who help oversee, advise or manage a combined property portfolio with an estimated replacement value of over $1.2 trillion. Website: http://stratacommunity.org.au/

(ENDS)

Contact Details

Chris Miller
President
Strata Community Association (ACT)
0400 376 208

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